Goodbye Turkey, Until Next Year

IMG_4163Our flights are confirmed, our bags packed. The boat will be hauled out for a while now for repairs, and Skipper and I will be ready to head to the airport tomorrow morning.

Istanbul is being kind and providing us with torrential rain and dark skies to get us used to our visit to the UK. (Although I’m told it’s hotter than Cyprus in London today.)

It’s been a long and busy season for us, and we are looking forward to a couple of weeks off before starting our new adventures.

There are new challenges back in the Mediterranean over the winter, and one or two intriguing offers further away to consider. Last night we got talking to an Australian couple who shared stories about their beautiful classic wooden boat, and persuaded us that we really need to put Australia on our list of top places to sail.

Now, we could really do with a holiday…

Big seas to the Istanbul Boat Show

IMG_4142We’ve just finished a high speed 390 nautical mile trip and have arrived in Istanbul for the boat show. The first day of the trip was a bit wild with Force 7 winds, gusting 8. That’s a big sea for a powerboat. All settled down on the second day and we arrived last night, a day early.

photo-23The sun is shining and all is bustle here on the pontoons with show stands still under construction, flower arrangements being delivered to yachts and showrooms, cleaners wiping and mopping and deckhands scrubbing and polishing.



The season is nearly over. Turkey has been amazing and being a galley girl on a powerboat has been a revelation.

Let me share with you again this video of an early evening trip home to our berth back in July. (I originally posted this in ‘The 5,000 HP Thrill Myth’, July Archives.) There have been ups and downs this summer, but despite my being a sailor at heart, there have been some special moments and I am almost won over to power boating.


A Day in the Life of Galley Girl: Part Three: Evening

IMG_4036It’s taken rather a long time to get round to the third part of this saga. We’ve been away cruising between Greece and Turkey. We’ve had a great time but the days have been long, with lots of playing on the jet ski and other garage toys.

I hope you can still remember the afternoon of Galley Girl’s day from my last post – thank you for waiting so patiently for the evening.

Anyway, finally, here is the third and final part of the saga of A Day in the Life of Galley Girl: Skipper has everything under control after a long day of fixing mechanical glitches. He’s been in the water a lot, mostly unexpectedly, fully clothed…

All is calm as the owners and guests relax on deck with fruit, sweetmeats and tea.

What could possibly go wrong….?

Continue reading “A Day in the Life of Galley Girl: Part Three: Evening”

A Day in the Life of Galley Girl. Part Two: Afternoon

The morning has been a busy one. In the second part of A Day in the Life of  Galley Girl, it’s already looking like it’s going to be a long day. And we have a problem with the anchor that we’re keeping quiet about.



The owner’s daughter wakes up. She is completely lovely and I happily make her breakfast and put it in the bin virtually untouched afterwards, just as I do every day for her brother. One of the guests asks for Turkish coffee and the daughter says she will make it. It’s a Turkish cultural thing, and like tea, it has its own mystique and ceremony. A prospective bride will make coffee for her future husband’s parents as a test of her suitability as a wife. Of course we have a machine to make coffee for us, but still there is something quite charming about this gorgeous girl meticulously arranging cups on a pretty tray and serving coffee to a very elderly and tubby old man. Once she’s finished the coffee and chosen the designer bikinis she will wear today I make her bed and clean her bathroom.

After an early start we have served three rounds of breakfasts, umpteen rounds of coffee, started on the housework, moved the boat to a new anchorage and got the toys out of the garage for the owners and guests to play with. We still have to fix the anchor winch which failed as we dropped anchor on arrival. Without it we can’t raise the anchor when we leave. Hauling 50 metres of chain up manually with a big anchor at the end is not an option…

Continue reading “A Day in the Life of Galley Girl. Part Two: Afternoon”

A Day in the Life of Galley Girl. Part One: Morning

There is never a typical day, ever, on board a boat. The weather, sea state, maintenance routines and repair issues all have a bearing on how the day will go. And if you are working aboard, then of course the demands and whims of your clients or owners and their guests will dictate where you end up and when. Some days are more memorable than others however…

0630 At anchor

photo-13The alarm goes off. I’ve been lightly awake since sunrise. The oblong square of the hatch, which is also our door, is open as always. We drape a mosquito net over the space and the sunlight streaming in is softened by the mesh. The air conditioning booms into action with the thud that always makes me jump. My bunk is not much longer than me but surprisingly comfortable, in a dark den kind of way. Skipper sleeps above in the longer bunk, which is set at right angles to mine, above the washing machine. The cabin is cosy, to say the least. And not in the least bit conducive to romance.

Continue reading “A Day in the Life of Galley Girl. Part One: Morning”

Bad Boat Names

IMG_0138Every time you call up a marina or another boat on the radio, the protocol is to announce your boat name at least twice, if not three times, for clarity. For example, a friend of mine, who named his boat ‘Blue’, would need to say: “Brixham Marina, Brixham Marina, this is Blue Blue Blue.”

He regularly caused consternation with his ‘Blue Blue Blue’ over the radio.  It sounded like he was sinking.

I’ve been looking around the marina and I’ve found some real beauties in bad boat names. Not with hidden consequences, like ‘Blue’, or incongruous, like ‘Flower’, but some truly dubious names for boats. Here are a few from my collection:



Ohhh. This is a fishing boat. I see what the owner’s done there. Yes, very clever.


This boat is an American flagged vessel, with English speaking owners one assumes, so there are no ‘lost in translation’ excuses. She is also shimmery brown and slightly sparkly.

Probably the Number One offender in my collection.


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The Big (Turkish) Breakfast, Spilled Blood, and a Bit of Bother with the Tea

Breakfast is very big in Turkey. So important in fact, that it is the only meal we ever serve on a boat that is so lacking in culinary aspiration that we don’t even have an oven in the galley – just a small ceramic electric hob with three tiny hotplates.

IMG_3971I took this photograph this morning, not on the boat, but at the little hotel where we occasionally go when the owners don’t need us on board overnight. (One day I shall show you our cabin and you will see why the hotel is such a welcome treat.)

As in an English Breakfast, there are important cultural as well as culinary traditions that govern the serving of a perfect Turkish Breakfast.  As much as porridge, bacon and eggs, kedgeree, toast and marmalade and tea, are to an English Breakfast, so cheese, eggs, tomatoes, cucumber, olives, simit, (a circular ring of seeded bread) honey and jam are to a Turkish Breakfast.

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Taking the Heat

0929 and 31ºc. That's with the air conditioning on.
0929 and 31ºc. And that’s with the air conditioning on.

It’s set to be the hottest day of the year in Turkey today. Istanbul is reporting 90% humidity. As our owner’s wife pointed out, it’s a good thing it’s a Saturday as people won’t have to go to work in this terrible heat.

Hmm. Yes, but actually I am at work today…

However the owner and his wife have gone ashore for a long leisurely coffee, so while we swing lazily at anchor I have picked up my laptop.

You will know that Turkey is a hot country. But unless you’ve been here in July and August, you cannot imagine the kind of searing heat and humidity that make your throat swell with every breath you take. From 8 am it is hot, hot, hot and the wet air is heavy to digest, sapping your strength and definitely your motivation to do very much at all.

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Garage Modifications

Skipper and I are proud of our garage. The boat may not be a super yacht but she has a sizeable boot in the stern. It’s bigger than our cabin next door – a lot bigger. Sometimes we dream about knocking through.

IMG_3611 3This is how it was in April when we first moved on board. A pristine palace for the jet ski and all the other toys yet to come.

Since then Skipper has thought up some modifications to accommodate the rapidly accumulating purchases. And to house all those useful things that can’t be thrown away because they might come in handy one day. Amongst which are:

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The Lady’s Maid

The owners of our boat have brought their maid to join us for the summer. This is great for me because there are differences between galley girls and ladies’ maids. Galley girls don’t lay out clothes and ladies’ maids don’t winch anchors, for one. Galley girls know where everything on the boat is stored and maids know what to do with it all. While I have been trusted to store our umpteen different sets of table linen, the choice is determined by the maid. This pretty dinner for two was arranged a few nights ago by her as a surprise to celebrate the owners’ wedding anniversary.

IMG_0166With the owners dispatched to the shore on a ruse thought up by their daughter, the maid had twenty minutes to arrange the table, sneak the flowers up from her bathroom where she had managed to have them smuggled to during the day, prepare bowls of nuts and fruits on beds of ice, frost the champagne glasses, light the candles and scatter shells across the tablecloth. (Shells because it was a subtle sea-sidey theme – as you might guess.)

IMG_0167Skipper and I gave an extra polish to the glass and chrome, retrieved the poshest champagne ice bucket from under the floor, put the smoochy french music in the CD player and waited on the swimming platform to help the owners on board when they arrived in the tender.

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The 5,000 HP Thrill Myth

The Skipper and I have been enjoying a couple of days off from work. Our owners (and I know we sound like faithful Labradors here) have left us on our own for a week. Repairs completed, all chores done, boat washed down, chrome polished and the laundry lists completed and dispatched, we are free to discover a little of Turkey, so we have joined friends from England for a few days of coastal sailing on their Beneteau 45’ yacht.

Continue reading “The 5,000 HP Thrill Myth”